These are the days of miracle and wonder

I’m not American, I didn’t cast a vote in the Nov. 4 election, and I’m not especially partisan (nor is this blog remotely political). I just wanted to make a very brief entry here about the courage to innovate.

All of us have said, at one time or another, that there’s no point in trying to break the pattern — we can’t change our career, our law firm, our faculty, our company, our whatever. We tell ourselves to be realistic: we can’t get past the entrenched interests, irrational biases or suffocating inertia that stand in our way.

That excuse just lost a lot of its power. It’s now recorded fact and history that all these things can be overcome. The unconventional can prove wise, the remotest odds can be surmounted, the unprecedented can become precedent — and president. The world now has an astonishing template and argument for innovation; no matter your politics or nationality, you’re the beneficiary.

Twenty years ago, our parents would never have believed it. Twenty years from now, our children will take it for granted. But right now, it’s our tremendous fortune to stand right on the equilibrium between “It can never happen” and “It can happen,” and to marvel at it. Take a moment to revel in a game-changing victory for the courage to innovate — the courage to try.

Then go make some precedents of your own. It can happen. It just did.



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