Jordan Furlong is a strategic consultant and analyst who forecasts the impact of the changing legal market on lawyers, law firms and legal organizations.

The Brink

Destroying your own business

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Filed under: Big Firms, Competition, Innovation

Well before Blockbuster Video actually filed for bankruptcy protection earlier this fall, The Onion produced a prescient video about a museum tour based on the movie rental chain: Historic ‘Blockbuster’ Store Offers Glimpse Of How Movies Were Rented In The Past. One dazzled visitor remarks: “It’s like stepping into a time machine … it’s hard… Read more »

What’s your sports department?

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Filed under: Innovation

As both a former journalist and a recovering professional sports fan, I was intrigued by this entry at Mark Coddington’s blog about innovation in newspapers. He reports on a study that found the department within most news organizations most amenable to innovation is actually Sports. The two journalism professors who prepared the report, along with… Read more »

Can’t buy me motivation

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Filed under: Satisfaction, Talent

I still remember the story told by a friend of mine who quit his job at a large national law firm. The income, of course, was great. But he had become increasingly unhappy with the work he was doing, the people he was doing it for, and the culture of the firm for which he… Read more »

John Plank joins Edge International

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Filed under: Edge

I’m extremely pleased to announce that another world-class consultant has opted to join the Edge International partnership! John Plank specializes in personal communications and speaking skills for managing partners, practice group leaders and trial lawyers. In addition to providing John’s services in leadership development and executive coaching, Edge is now the exclusive provider of John’s… Read more »

Law as an undergraduate degree

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Filed under: Law School

The start of the school year is upon us. You can tell from the firestorm of written commentary in the legal press and blawgosphere about the function, fitness and future of legal education. Fanning the flames hardest is Brent Evan Newton, an adjunct professor at the Georgetown University Law Center, who has written an article… Read more »

Pam Woldow joins Edge International

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Filed under: Uncategorized

It’s my tremendous pleasure to announce that Pamela H. Woldow, one of the world’s top legal consultants and an unparalleled expert in legal project management and alternative fee arrangements, has joined Edge International as our partner and general counsel. To those of you who read this blog regularly, Pam requires no introduction: you’ve seen me… Read more »

Will-writing and the redefinition of “legal services”

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Filed under: Clients, Competition, Governance, Outsourcing

Last month, a BBC investigative program called Panorama exposed a wide range of illegal and unethical practices by “will-writers,” advisors who help people prepare wills and who are not lawyers. One result of that broadcast could be a significant clawback of lawyer regulatory power over the legal services marketplace in the UK, with implications for… Read more »

Six for the road

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Filed under: Law21, Stem

I’ve been an active contributor lately to a number of other blogs and periodicals, so I thought you might be interested in checking some of them out. Here are six articles I’ve written at other legal sites recently. 1. “Letting the client decide,” Slaw: Brand new this morning, my newest column looks at a UK… Read more »

Law firms and the JetBlue guy

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Filed under: Competition, New Lawyers, Talent

Even if former JetBlue flight attendant Steven Slater didn’t plan his famous chute-deploying resignation in advance, he seems ready and willing to exploit the moment, perhaps to land a reality-TV hosting gig. If it does turn out that his Big Quit was staged (like that of Elyse Porterfield, the “Dry-Erase Girl” whose hoax didn’t even… Read more »

“The last couple of years have been a golden era for employers — they’ve found that they can hire whom they want at lower wages, and that it’s easier to retain folks without having to boost salaries. But at some point, companies that want to grow will have to break down and hire new people, or turn part-timers into full-timers, or put contractors on the payroll. Many employers are treating existing and potential employees as if they’re desperate for work. And plenty of Americans are. But desperate times can lead to desperate measures. Push your workforce too hard without adequate reward, and someone just might tell you to take this job and shove it.”

I was reminded of this observation when reading the latest financial report from a large law firm: “Profits rose, revenue dipped at Baker & McKenzie in fiscal 2010.” I’ve seen a couple dozen of these stories in the mainstream legal press over the past few months, breathlessly announcing what amounts to the same thing over and over: firms are bringing in less money, but partners are reaping higher profits. That happy result comes from the important middle step that the headlines don’t include: “Revenues down, costs slashed in a surge of panic, profits up.”

We all remember the bloodletting committed by large law firms in the wake of the financial crisis, as staffers and junior lawyers found themselves out on the street. The firms that threw their most vulnerable over the side then are the same firms reporting rising profits now. It was ever thus — that’s how businesses work, chopping assets (including people) to ensure continued or improved profits for shareholders. But when you chop and chop, making abundantly clear that employees will always be let go at the first sign of profit trouble, then you also risk the full-scale alienation of your talent pool.

Tens of thousands of 2008-10 law schools grads are still deeply in debt and struggling to find law jobs to stay afloat, even to the point of moving to India to work for an LPO. Many law firm partners, I think, have forgotten just how frustrating and humiliating it can be to have no job and no prospect of finding one — and they never had to look for work in an economy like this, where unemployment shows every sign of becoming chronic. And to rub salt in the wound, the law firms that cast off their young lawyers love to blame the victim, castigating new grads for their “sense of entitlement” and “lack of work ethic.” This can’t continue without inflicting real damage.

There are plenty of archaic traditions in the legal profession that have no place in the 21st century. But one tradition that deserves its place of pride is the responsibility to help usher in the next generation of practitioners. The recognition that today’s juniors are tomorrow’s leaders was sufficiently widespread that firms took care of their people as a matter of course. As stewardship in the legal profession has faded, first gradually and then dramatically, lawyers’ trust in the firm and the partnership has faded with it. This isn’t just something we should feel bad about. This is a collective decision to exploit legal talent at the worst possible time.

Throughout this coming decade, we are going to see the continuous rise of lawyers engaged in legal services but employed by non-lawyer entities. Legal process outsourcers, e-discovery providers, document assembly companies, legal project management experts, legal knowledge professionals, and many other entities outside the law firm world will be hiring experienced lawyers to populate their offices. Law firms that took care of their people in the tough times will have nothing to fear; those that didn’t will be astonished and appalled at how easily their lawyers and legal professionals will be poached. Steven Slater’s real-life jump, no matter how contrived it might have been, reflects employees’ economy-wide readiness to jump from jobs that treat them as fungible, exploitable, and expendable. If that’s how you’ve treated your people, you can look forward to the day when they return the favour.

How to kill a law firm

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Filed under: Competition, Innovation

There’s a story told about Jack Welch, former GE president — it might be from one of his books, or it might be apocryphal; quite possibly it’s both. The story goes that soon after he took over the company, he called in his vice-presidents and other senior people and advised them that countless smaller companies… Read more »

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