Countdown: it’s time to enter the 2011 InnovAction Awards

Lawyers are supposedly averse to innovation. Apparently, someone forgot to inform these law firms and companies.

These are just some of the most innovative developments in the legal marketplace over the past year — this short list doesn’t touch on the increasing use of alternative fees in law firms, the development of low-cost non-lawyer service providers, and the continuing evolution of legal process outsourcing providers. Innovation in the legal market is real, and if you’re not actively pursuing innovations of your own, you’re in danger of missing out on a critical period in the profession’s history.

But if you’re currently pursuing or have implemented innovations in your law firm (or law department, law school, startup company, etc.), then you have less than three weeks left to submit a nomination for a 2011 InnovAction Award, sponsored by the College of Law Practice Management. The InnovAction Awards, of which I’m proud to serve as Chair, recognize outstanding innovation in the delivery of legal services, the managing or marketing of a law firm, or the conduct of client relationships.

This year, as this Inside Legal announcement explains, the Awards have slightly altered their criteria. No longer is it required that winning entries do something that has “never been done before” — we recognized that innovation is too widespread and too viral in the marketplace to continue to require absolute lack of precedent. Instead, we’re now applying a more nuanced four-part criteria:

  • Disruption: Does this entry change an important element of the legal services process for the better, and marketplace expectations along with it?
  • Value: Is the client and/or legal industry better off because of this entry, in terms of the affordability, ease, relevance or its effect on legal services?
  • Effectiveness: Has this entry delivered real, demonstrable or measurable benefits, for the provider, its clients, or the marketplace generally?
  • Originality:  Is this a novel idea or approach, or a new twist on an existing idea or approach?

If you’ve undertaken and accomplished an innovation within your enterprise within the last three years that fits these criteria, I strongly encourage you to seek out the peer recognition you deserve. More details and an entry form are available at the InnovAction website, and I’m available anytime to answer any questions you might have.

It’s time to go innovate. If you’ve already done so, it’s time to come collect your reward.

Why do law firms exist?

What is the point of a law firm?

This is neither a rhetorical nor a snarky question. I’m interested in nailing down the economic rationale for a law firm’s existence. What benefits flow to both clients and lawyers from law firms? In what ways are the buyers and sellers of legal services better off because a law firm is the platform of choice for their transactions (instead of, say, an individual lawyer-client exchange)?

A good way to answer that question, I think, is by reference to the work of 20th-century economist Ronald Coase, who (among other things) authored a pioneering treatise titled The Nature of The Firm. As The Economist observed in celebrating Coase’s 100th birthday last year, Coase asked and answered a similar question in the business world: why do companies exist? “His central insight,” The Economist wrote, “was that firms exist because going to the market all the time can impose heavy transaction costs. You need to hire workers, negotiate prices and enforce contracts, to name but three time-consuming activities. A firm is essentially a device for creating long-term contracts when short-term contracts are too bothersome.”

The magazine went on to point out that while important, reducing transaction friction is only a partial answer to the why of corporations: “[Companies] can marshal a wide range of resources — particularly nebulous ones such as ‘corporate culture’ and ‘collective knowledge’ — that markets cannot access. Companies can organize production and create knowledge in unique ways. They can also make long-term bets on innovations that will redefine markets rather than merely satisfy demand.”

Companies exist, therefore, because they:

  • reduce transaction costs,
  • build valuable culture,
  • organize production,
  • assemble collective knowledge, and
  • spur innovation.

So now let’s take a look at law firms. I don’t think it would be too huge a liberty to state that as a general rule, law firms:

  • develop relatively weak and fragmented cultures,
  • manage production and process indifferently,
  • assign and perform work inefficiently,
  • share knowledge haphazardly and grudgingly, and
  • display almost no interest in innovation.

That’s an inventory of defects that would make Ronald Coase wonder exactly what it is that keeps law firms together as commercial entities. And he’d be further daunted by the following considerations:

  • This week, Bruce MacEwen at Adam Smith Esq. wrote about the difficulty of “branding” a law firm: “Law firm partners are anything but designed or acculturated to delivering a ‘consistent experience’ or ‘a particular quality level.'” And in any event, he added, “what exactly is the [law firm brand] promise?” In many law firms, the client experience varies wildly from lawyer to lawyer, to such an extent that basic documentation and even invoices will differ from one partner to another. In that light, it’s difficult to say that a law firm has an “identity” or a “way of doing business.”
  • Last week, Mark Hermann at Above The Law, tackling the old question of whether clients hire lawyers or firms,  averred that “[i]f clients have any sense at all, they hire lawyers.” This is because firms are unsure of the quality of their own lawyers, and because hardly any firm systematically conducts internal quality assurance to review and approve its lawyers’ work. For the same reason, lawyers are reluctant to cross-sell “partners” whose expertise they don’t know or trust and to whom they won’t dare refer their prized clients.
  • Back in July 2010, Anthony Kearns wrote for The American Lawyer about the absence of risk assessment and post-mortem systems in law firms. These systems could reduce the chances that something will go wrong in the first place, and could create processes by which lessons can be learned from errors and the same mistakes avoided in future. But law firms are extremely culturally resistant to admitting that lawyers have failed in the past and will fail again — and as a result, there is no institutional expectation that errors be acknowledged and treated as learning opportunities.

These are not problems, it should be noted, that you can easily correct through the simple application of good management practices. These are problems bred deep in the bones of lawyer culture. Lawyers tend to protect and promote their own individual interests over that of the collective to which they belong. Many sensible management innovations that have tried to gain a foothold in law firms over the past couple of decades — including knowledge management, cross-selling, brand discipline, billing reform, associate apprenticeship, collaborative workflow, and so forth — have foundered on the shoals of lawyers’ reluctance to sacrifice some individual short-term good for some collective long-term gain. This isn’t a bug of law firms; it’s a feature.

So what does that leave? From the original list of Coaseian advantages, we still have the first and most important: the reduction of transaction costs. There’s no denying that this is an important and useful aspect of a law firm. While there are many legal tasks that can be accomplished fairly easily by a single lawyer working alone, there are many more that require more resources to accomplish: other lawyers, numerous staff, many knowledge assets, multiple connections and contacts, and so forth. A client with an even slightly complicated legal matter does not want to go out and contract individually with each of these players and suppliers; she wants a centralized platform, a one-stop shop. Lawyers, equally, don’t want to access the market every time they need an asset; they prefer to keep them all on hand.

And that, to make an over-long story short, is why I think the fragmenting of legal services and the rise of viable non-firm suppliers pose a threat to the continued existence of law firms. New competition and technology are lowering the transaction costs of complex legal work; they’re reducing the friction loss traditionally associated with repeatedly accessing the legal market. New resources such as legal process outsourcing companies, virtual law firms, temporary and contract lawyers, and sophisticated software programs are available, reliable, and increasingly accessible in a timely and cost-effective fashion. We used to lower the hassle and cost of accessing multiple legal resources by putting them all inside a law firm; we don’t need to do that anymore. The remaining fundamental rationale for law firms is under siege.

To be clear, I’m not forecasting an imminent worldwide cull of law firms; many firms are still better at cost-effective legal transaction facilitation than the vast but jumbled array of separate providers. But we’re about to see the rise of a new generation of effective legal resource organizers (which, when you think about it, is all law firms really are). They’ll organize disparate, far-flung, specialized suppliers of legal services into a complex, finely tuned, just-in-time assembly and delivery system for complex legal services — supply chain managers for the modern legal marketplace. And they’ll do it more affordably and with better quality controls that law firms can offer. Some firms might evolve to fill this role, but if they do, we’ll barely recognize them when compared to their ancestors. Legal information and systems companies like Thomson or Lexis might fit the bill; so might LPOs; so might completely new businesses financed through the Legal Services Act.

That’s why law firms need to understand their own economic purpose, what role they really serve in the market. If, as I’ve argued, it’s to be an effective organizer of legal resources, then they need to get much, much better at identifying, organizing, and efficiently managing those resources, inside and (especially) outside their walls. That’s the role — quarterback, manager, general contractor, call it what you like — that’s up for grabs right now, and it’s the only one that really matters. That’s the point of a law firm.

Jordan Furlong speaks to law firms and legal organizations throughout North America on how to survive and profit from the extraordinary changes underway in the legal services marketplace. He is a partner with Edge International and a senior consultant with Stem Legal Web Enterprises.

Legal Marketing Association Toronto Chapter’s Luncheon Seminar, Toronto, ON

I’m looking forward to addressing the Legal Marketing Association Toronto Chapter‘s Luncheon Seminar on June 23, 2011, at the Toronto Board of Trade. I’ll be speaking about the implications of the waves of change in the legal marketplace, with an emphasis on the Canadian market and the incursion of global law firms.

Please note that this event was postponed from its original May 26 slot — my sincere thanks to the LMA-Toronto for rescheduling!

A changing of the guard

Legal historians might look back at the spring of 2011 and judge it the time when the old law firm model began to pass away and a new one began to take its place. Specifically, they might contrast last month’s dissolution of Washington-based global firm Howrey LLP with today’s announcement by 300-lawyer Irwin Mitchell LLP (the first by a major UK firm) that it intends to convert to an Alternative Business Structure under the Legal Services Act.

Personally, I was sorry to see Howrey go, especially since I’ve written about several worthwhile initiatives the firm undertook these last few years, including Howrey University, merit-based associate compensation, and joining the short-lived associate apprenticeship trend. Whatever else it did wrong, Howrey did or tried to do a number of things right.

But the process by which it sank deserves further examination. Most of the Howrey post-mortems identified some common causes of Howrey’s fate: too-rapid international expansion, an increasing numbers of conflicts, an over-reliance on contingency litigation that suffocated cash flow, low-cost non-lawyer competition for process work, and eventually, a growing loss of confidence in leadership. Some of that holds up, and some of it doesn’t. But if it sounds to you like these factors are not unique to Howrey, but in fact could be shared by a number of other law firms, you’re right.

Yet an even more important factor, also shared by several other firms, lurks behind the collapse: a culture too weak to withstand all these pressures. An article about Howrey in CPA Global’s New Legal Review included this observation from legal consultant Brad Blickstein: [T]his firm had been on the cutting edge for a long time. Attorneys, however, do not tend to embrace change. For a firm to be “non-traditional”, its attorneys have to believe. The firm grew so quickly through the merger that many partners did not grow up in this culture. When times got rough, they did not have the fortitude or desire to continue being non-traditional.

Writing in the Washington Post, Steven Pearlstein drew a similar conclusion: Howrey … was not a strong partnership. Over the past 20 years, it had more than tripled in size by luring away lawyers from other firms and setting them up in offices that had little traffic with each other, or with the lawyers back in Washington. For the most part, these were lawyers willing to switch firms because of the prospect of earning more money and attracting more clients, and for many years, it worked out just that way. But then, suddenly, it didn’t, for one year and then a second, without any clear indication of when or whether things would finally turn around. And it was then, by last autumn, that it began to be clear that the personal roots were not deep enough, the bonds of loyalty not strong enough, to hold Howrey together.

There’s more Howrey in many law firms today than those firms would like to admit. Firms built primarily (if not entirely) on the foundation of partner profitability shake and totter whenever that foundation is threatened. Think back to the financial meltdown and to the massive associate and staff firings that followed: they were done solely to preserve profitability levels and prevent the kind of crisis of confidence and partner desertions that marked the beginning of Howrey’s end. If there’s nothing keeping partners within your walls beyond their annual draw — and that’s the dominant modern law firm model — then a Howrey-style disaster is always going to be one string of bad results away. That’s a risky and stressful way for a law firm to live.

At the same time, from England & Wales, comes the first sign of a different approach. Here are some excerpts from the news that Irwin Mitchell, a full-service firm with an affinity for personal injury work, has retained an investment bank to guide it through the ABS process:

All options are up for consideration, with the aim being to raise a war chest to fund future growth. Managing partner John Pickering said: “Conversion to an ABS will broaden our access to capital and enhance our funding flexibility as we execute our strategic growth plan, while ensuring that we can continue to provide the very highest standards of service to our clients. … The Legal Services Act will create exciting growth opportunities for strong, well-financed legal services businesses to accelerate their growth plans. Irwin Mitchell intends to be at the forefront of these changes and we have therefore taken the decision to seek external investment to further our ambitious plans for the business.” …

In preparation for the conversion, Irwin Mitchell is to restructure into a two-tier business, with the creation of a corporate vehicle. The firm will continue to operate as a limited liability partnership (LLP) and the new holding company is intended to become the controlling member of the LLP. Irwin Mitchell has a strong personal injury base and in recent years has invested in its affinity business to build up branded consumer-focused products. This has been part of a long-term strategy to build up a series of branded goods that could be offered to the consumer market. In March last year, the firm signed a deal with the Daily Telegraph that enabled it to offer legal services to the national newspaper’s readers.

I noted last week that law firms, as compared to non-lawyer legal businesses, likely will have a tougher time attracting equity investment (for an excellent illustration why, check out John Wallbillich’s fictional law firm IPO). So it might be that Irwin Mitchell will fail to find a backer to its liking.

But it’s clear that the firm has been preparing for this move for quite some time, carving out a commoditized services section on its website. At a time when small-firm franchisor Quality Solicitors is about to open legal service kiosks in British bookstores, consumer and small-business legal work seems to be leading the revolution. More interestingly, recall that the world’s first law firm to acquire outside investment, Australia’s Slater & Gordon, was also a personal injury firm that floated shares on the stock exchange and proceeded to go on a massive and profitable law firm buying spree.

But most interesting of all might be a common reaction, in reader comments and Twitter posts, that a public offering or other equity investment in Irwin Mitchell will quickly result in a number of senior partners cashing out and leaving everyone else behind. “ABS is just money for old men. Prepare for the senior associate exodus,” says one commenter at The Lawyer. Steven Harper echoes that thought: Many of those in big law who already take a short-term economic view of their institutions would leap at the opportunity for a one-time payday that discounted future cash flows to today’s dollar. In fact, a big lump sum will tempt every equity partner who worries about next year’s annual review.

But I wonder whether for some firms, that would be less a fatal flaw than simply part of the plan. It’s possible Irwin Mitchell may have decided that what it offers is more important than who offers it. It may have decided that in the future legal marketplace, lawyer-critical work — major assignments that only a very few lawyers are trusted to handle — is a diminishing asset, whereas ordinary-course-of-business and commodity work is set to grow rapidly.

It may, in fact, have recognized the problem common to law firms everywhere — that rainmakers and other heavyweights exercise an unhealthy degree of influence over a firm’s fortunes — and responded with a strategy that lessens the risk and impact of that problem. It may envision a law firm model where the firm’s overall profitability, not each partner’s individual profitability, is the driving force. A firm like this might be only too happy to see some partners cash out, because the firm has bigger plans than simply being that partner’s most convenient current platform for generating profit and can do without the risk of his or her abrupt departure.

It’s still very early days, of course. But it’s possible we’re seeing the sun start to set on one law firm model and start to rise on another. Howrey illustrates that the fundamental purpose of the traditional law firm — to maximize profit annually for its partners — damages and can fatally undermine its culture, and is unacceptably prone to the risk that panicking partners will make a run on the bank and leave. Irwin Mitchell suggests that an alternative model — deliver legal services systematically, efficiently and effectively to generate a reliable firm-wide profit, minus the risk that partner defections could sink the whole enterprise — might catch the attention of both the purchasers and funders of legal service businesses. If both of these are true, then we might currently be watching a changing of the guard.

Jordan Furlong speaks to law firms and legal organizations throughout North America on how to survive and profit from the extraordinary changes underway in the legal services marketplace. He is a partner with Edge International and a senior consultant with Stem Legal Web Enterprises.

Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society Annual Meeting, Halifax, NS

I’m very happy to be co-presenting “Back to Law School: Strong Traditions, Fresh Ideas,” the annual meeting of the Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society in Halifax on June 11, 2011. I’m particularly pleased that my co-host will be Matt Homann of St. Louis, leading legal innovator and founder of LexThink LLC.

Solo innovation

Conventional wisdom has it that when the meteor struck the earth millions of years ago, the small early mammals survived because they could slip into underground holes and caves, while the larger dinosaurs, with nowhere to go, were struck down. Not to do overdo the analogy, but a series of innovations in solo and small-firm practice indicates to me we’re looking at mammals making contingency plans.

From the UK, where so much innovation is emerging these days, comes Get Solicitors, which Legal Futures describes as “an alternative to national, branded networks by giving solicitors the tools to market and build their own brands. … Managing partner Brian McKibbin said the focus is online marketing, along with relationship building to help firms become lynch pins in their local business communities. There is also practice management advice. ‘We don’t think the way forward is a homogenous legal brand,’ he said. The future for law firms is going to be in looking and feeling like a law firm, rather than like Co-operative Legal Services or RBS Legal.'”

From the US comes an even more attractive proposition: my friends at Solo Practice University have announced a creative new program called “Building Bridges to Professional Independence,” under which law schools partner with SPU to provide scholarships to some of their upper-year students and discounted tuition rates for other students and alumni. This weekend at the Future Ed conference co-sponsored by New York Law School and Harvard Law School, the first Bridges partner, New York Law School, will come on board. I know that SPU is speaking with other law schools about coming on board as well, but kudos to New York Law School for starting it off. (And while I’m thinking of it, don’t forget about Law21’s SPU scholarship contest.)

This is the way, it seems to me, that solos and small-firm lawyers will survive the deluge and thrive afterwards. GetSolicitors and similar services provide a practice management and marketplace foundation for small-firm lawyers, putting them in position to focus on their work. The Bridges program, moreover, is exactly what we need in this profession — a way for new lawyers to get the best of both worlds, a solid law school education and a practical introduction to what being a lawyer actually involves. While a few larger firms have set up excellent professional development programs, most seem to assume that their new lawyers will “pick it up” along the way to various degree. Solos don’t have that luxury, and that’s why it’s natural that this sector is taking the right steps forward.

Is the future of BigLaw smaller? Quite possibly — but the future of law generally is going to belong to whoever is first and best out of the gate these next few years, as the assumptions upon which we’ve depended start to fall away.

Jordan Furlong speaks to law firms and legal organizations throughout North America on how to survive and profit from the extraordinary changes underway in the legal services marketplace. He is a partner with Edge International and a senior consultant with Stem Legal Web Enterprises.

Not wanted on the voyage

From the incumbent’s point of view, the only thing worse than a revolution that topples you is one that renders you irrelevant. You can mount a comeback from exile; you can’t mount a comeback from Nobody Cares. Law firms, pay close attention.

We’re now less than six months away from the implementation of the Alternative Business Structures (ABS) provisions of England & Wales’ Legal Services Act. This event has been forecast as law’s “Big Bang,” the equivalent of financial services deregulation in the UK in the 1980s, although I suspect this will be a long rumble of change rather than a sudden explosion. But as we get closer to October 6, signs are emerging that should be making British firms very uncomfortable and firms elsewhere in the world more than a little uneasy. It’s quite possible that the biggest change in legal marketplace history will pass law firms by.

The Legal Futures website reported last week that English and Welsh law firms are finally starting to take ABSs seriously and are becoming more amenable to external investment. The bad news: the investors may already have lost interest. “City solicitor Paul Harding, who heads ABS Advisory Partners, said he was ‘absolutely convinced’ that private equity firms were getting ‘cold feet’ because of the difficulties they foresaw from investing in partnerships. … Mr Harding said law firms do not really understand what an investor would require of them. ‘They’re thinking about creating capital value that they can buy and sell, and not looking any further than that. They’re in for a shock. If money is made available, they won’t like the terms.’”

Subsequently, at an ABS-themed conference sponsored by Legal Futures, Richard Susskind issued the same warning: most law firms will not be invited to this party. “Law firms hold few attractions to private equity investors because there is no obvious exit route and little profit, he said, predicting that external investment will be made exclusively in new forms of legal business: ‘These are the businesses that are growing; doubling, tripling, quadrupling every year. Of course they’re going to attract investment.'”

When you think about it, the idea that private equity will bypass law firms and roll straight into new business models makes perfect sense. As any managing partner will tell you, running a typical firm is a task that inspires mythic adjectives like Herculean or Sisyphean. Law firms resist corporate management the way cats resist baths. John Wallbillich at The Wired GC illustrates this perfectly by listing five reasons why law firms couldn’t adopt the Goldman Sachs model:

  1. They don’t hire the best and then invest in their development.
  2. They don’t honestly evaluate talent at all levels.
  3. They don’t make people leave who don’t perform.
  4. They don’t directly link pay with performance.
  5. They don’t accept downside risk for upside reward.

Savvy investors would balk at an operation that failed on one of these points; most law firms fail on all five. Why would investment firms take on the headache and heartache of trying to corral hundreds of independent lawyers who each insist on professional autonomy and consistently put their own interests ahead of the firm’s? Many law firm partners, if offered cash for an equity position in their firms, would likely take the money and run. Private investors are fully aware that six months after buying your average law firm, they’d be left with a logo, a lease, and an unfunded pension plan.

Much better, from the investment community’s point of view, to start from scratch. Finance a small greenfield firm where lawyers work efficiently, price by value and are committed to the cause. Alternatively, kick the tires on some of these virtual or distributed firms that deliver results without overhead and attitude. Better yet, never mind the lawyers: go find an LPO the way Thomson Reuters did, inject millions of dollars into its operations, and see what happens. Or throw your weight behind a document service company like LegalZoom or a small-firm franchisor like Quality Solicitors. In all these cases, investors will be looking for private companies that think and behave like private companies, not like country clubs with billable-hour targets.

The threat of irrelevance is not limited to either the UK or the ABS world: it represents a general marketplace shift away from the traditional providers of legal services and their bases. The Daily Business Review recently published an account of a conference where in-house counsel from Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard — not exactly lightweight clients — cheerfully described all the ways in which they were slicing millions of dollars off their annual legal spend.

But the Microsoft lawyer also threw in a statement that should make even the biggest and most “prestigious” firms shiver: “‘When I started,’ he said, ‘everything I did … all the regulatory work … was centered in Washington. Now the centers of power are Asia, Sao Paulo and Moscow. … All the complex legal issues these days are outside the United States.” In other words, complex legal issues — the ones that big firms pursue because they pay off so handsomely in money and prestige — are leaving the building. If you’re a US firm that stretches no farther than the continental 48, that’s a problem.

A year or so ago, I quoted a Seth Godin observation: “When the platform changes, the leaders change.” I think that process is now underway in the law: a shift in the marketplace environment that has a very good chance of deposing incumbents and producing brand new players. Twelve months from now, when the first ABS dollars start circulating through the system worldwide, we should start to see that shift manifest itself.

Law firms that want to survive this change could stand to do a lot of things, but they might be best advised to start with management. Specifically, they could junk a model where the owners manage the business, manage it according to their individual short-term interests, and treat the firm as a means to an end rather than an end in itself. The global legal market is about to hand down a verdict on that model: it doesn’t deliver what we need. It’s irrelevant.

Jordan Furlong speaks to law firms and legal organizations throughout North America on how to survive and profit from the extraordinary changes underway in the legal services marketplace. He is a partner with Edge International and a senior consultant with Stem Legal Web Enterprises.

I get around

Time for another roundup of articles I’ve recently published elsewhere — a bit more extensive than usual — with the thought that you might find some of them interesting.

I’d like to start with a link to the newest edition of the Edge International Review, a semi-annual collection of articles from my partners in Edge. I served as editor of this issue and contributed an article titled: “The talent portfolio: where, how and by whom your work is done.” The Review will be mailed out this week to thousands of subscribers; if you’d like to be added to the subscriber list (or to receive Edge’s free e-newsletter, containing more exclusive articles by Edge partners), please drop me a line.

For the Canadian Bar Association’s National magazine, I wrote a cover story on the most recent round of mergers in the Canadian law firm marketplace. “Merger mania” featured lengthy interviews with the managing partners of Norton Rose, Ogilvy Renault, Miller Thomson and McMillan LLP. I think you’ll find their perspectives on the rapidly evolving law firm landscape to be illuminating.

For the CBA’s PracticeLink online periodical, I wrote an article titled: “How to use old media to access new media,” which talks about how social networks can help you raise your profile in the mainstream and legal press. I followed that up with a complementary post at Stem Legal’s Law Firm Web Strategy blog that added more pointers for joining old and new media in your marketing efforts.

Also for the Law Firm Web Strategy Blog, I welcomed new Stem client Harrison Pensa of London, Ontario, to the fold, and later highlighted the firm’s innovative new privacy policy generator. In addition, responding to a trend I’m seeing among law firms struggling to create original content, I wrote a primer titled: “Reluctant publishers: helping lawyers generate content.

For The Lawyers Weekly newspaper, I published two columns: one on the strategic management of legal talent, and the other on a subject I wish would get more serious attention in the legal profession. “Law firm diversity beyond the platitudes” cites the example of Nixon Peabody’s diversity initiative, which is the most demanding and the most pragmatic I’ve yet seen.

My regular column for Slaw, “Exploding some law school myths,” generated a remarkably large and intense amount of feedback. Read the article and review the provocative comments to get a sense of popular feelings about law school these days.

For Attorney At Work, I wrote two articles: “Create legal annual reports for your clients” received a very positive response to its idea of preparing yearly reviews and previews of clients’ legal health, while “Demographic business development” talked about generational change from clients’, rather than the lawyer’s, perspective.

Susan Cartier Liebel and her great team at Solo Practice University were kind enough to interview me for a two-part webinar on the future of the legal profession. (Note: if you haven’t heard about my SPU scholarship contest, check it out here.)

Finally, I was honoured to be interviewed or republished by some leading media outlets over the last couple of months.

A last couple of notes: April 1 finds me in Quebec City addressing the spring meeting of the Chambre des Notaires, the governing body of Quebec’s notaries, while April 4 brings me to Orlando to open the MasterMinds session at the 25th annual conference of the Legal Marketing Association. If you’re attending either of these events, please send me an email and let me know.

Jordan Furlong speaks to law firms and legal organizations throughout North America on how to survive and profit from the extraordinary changes underway in the legal services marketplace. He is a partner with Edge International and a senior consultant with Stem Legal Web Enterprises.